• Ann-Weiner
    Souad

    A Survivor of Honor Killing

    Souad-Suanda, (her true identity must remain hidden), was 17 years old in 1974 when she looked over the terrace of her home in the West Bank and first saw the young man she fell in love with. Over time they arranged clandestine meetings and he promised to ask for her hand in marriage once her older sister was married. The relationship continued until a terrified Souad discovered that she was pregnant. Fearing reprisal from her family, she tried to miscarry the baby and when that failed she attempted, unsuccessfully, to run away.

    Having brought shame upon their family and in keeping with the principles of their community, her father arranged for a male cousin to kill Souad in order to save their honor. Honor killings are acts of vengeance committed by male family members against women who are believed to have brought dishonor to their family.1 Such killings happen in all geographical regions and are highest in the Muslim world. They are not connected to religious beliefs but rather to “patriarchal and traditional world views, emphasis placed on female virtue and a more general belief that violence against others is morally justified.” 2

    Honor-based violence such as murder and attempted murder are acts of torture since death rarely occurs quickly. They include acid burnings, beheadings, stoning, and immolation. Although Souad’s cousin poured gasoline over her head and set her on fire, Souad lived and was treated for horrific burns on her head and neck and arms and chest. While in a coma and bent into a mummy-like ball she gave birth to her son.

    A humanitarian organization eventually transported Souad to Geneva to help her recover from her pain and suffering and build a new life. Her autobiography Burned Alive: A Victim of the Law of Men is one of the few accounts by survivors of honor killings because so few victims live to tell their stories.

    Although Souad lives thousands of kilometers away from her country of origin, she dares not reveal her true identity or her whereabouts in fear that her family would find her and attempt to have her killed a second time.

    (click to continue)


    1. http://goldenageofgaia.com/building-nova-earth-toward-a-world-that-works-for-everyone/ending-gender-persecution/honor-killings-must-stop/
    2. Chesler, Phyllis, “Worldwide trends in Honor Killings,” The Middle East Quarterly. Spring 2010 Volume 17, pp. 3-11

  • Ann-Weiner
    Souad

    A Survivor of Honor Killing

    Souad-Suanda, (her true identity must remain hidden), was 17 years old in 1974 when she looked over the terrace of her home in the West Bank and first saw the young man she fell in love with. Over time they arranged clandestine meetings and he promised to ask for her hand in marriage once her older sister was married. The relationship continued until a terrified Souad discovered that she was pregnant. Fearing reprisal from her family, she tried to miscarry the baby and when that failed she attempted, unsuccessfully, to run away.

    Having brought shame upon their family and in keeping with the principles of their community, her father arranged for a male cousin to kill Souad in order to save their honor. Honor killings are acts of vengeance committed by male family members against women who are believed to have brought dishonor to their family.1 Such killings happen in all geographical regions and are highest in the Muslim world. They are not connected to religious beliefs but rather to “patriarchal and traditional world views, emphasis placed on female virtue and a more general belief that violence against others is morally justified.” 2

    Honor-based violence such as murder and attempted murder are acts of torture since death rarely occurs quickly. They include acid burnings, beheadings, stoning, and immolation. Although Souad’s cousin poured gasoline over her head and set her on fire, Souad lived and was treated for horrific burns on her head and neck and arms and chest. While in a coma and bent into a mummy-like ball she gave birth to her son.

    A humanitarian organization eventually transported Souad to Geneva to help her recover from her pain and suffering and build a new life. Her autobiography Burned Alive: A Victim of the Law of Men is one of the few accounts by survivors of honor killings because so few victims live to tell their stories.

    Although Souad lives thousands of kilometers away from her country of origin, she dares not reveal her true identity or her whereabouts in fear that her family would find her and attempt to have her killed a second time.

    (click to continue)


    1. http://goldenageofgaia.com/building-nova-earth-toward-a-world-that-works-for-everyone/ending-gender-persecution/honor-killings-must-stop/
    2. Chesler, Phyllis, “Worldwide trends in Honor Killings,” The Middle East Quarterly. Spring 2010 Volume 17, pp. 3-11

  • Ann-Weiner
    Souad

    A Survivor of Honor Killing

    Souad-Suanda, (her true identity must remain hidden), was 17 years old in 1974 when she looked over the terrace of her home in the West Bank and first saw the young man she fell in love with. Over time they arranged clandestine meetings and he promised to ask for her hand in marriage once her older sister was married. The relationship continued until a terrified Souad discovered that she was pregnant. Fearing reprisal from her family, she tried to miscarry the baby and when that failed she attempted, unsuccessfully, to run away.

    Having brought shame upon their family and in keeping with the principles of their community, her father arranged for a male cousin to kill Souad in order to save their honor. Honor killings are acts of vengeance committed by male family members against women who are believed to have brought dishonor to their family.1 Such killings happen in all geographical regions and are highest in the Muslim world. They are not connected to religious beliefs but rather to “patriarchal and traditional world views, emphasis placed on female virtue and a more general belief that violence against others is morally justified.” 2

    Honor-based violence such as murder and attempted murder are acts of torture since death rarely occurs quickly. They include acid burnings, beheadings, stoning, and immolation. Although Souad’s cousin poured gasoline over her head and set her on fire, Souad lived and was treated for horrific burns on her head and neck and arms and chest. While in a coma and bent into a mummy-like ball she gave birth to her son.

    A humanitarian organization eventually transported Souad to Geneva to help her recover from her pain and suffering and build a new life. Her autobiography Burned Alive: A Victim of the Law of Men is one of the few accounts by survivors of honor killings because so few victims live to tell their stories.

    Although Souad lives thousands of kilometers away from her country of origin, she dares not reveal her true identity or her whereabouts in fear that her family would find her and attempt to have her killed a second time. <
    1. http://goldenageofgaia.com/building-nova-earth-toward-a-world-that-works-for-everyone/ending-gender-persecution/honor-killings-must-stop/
    2. Chesler, Phyllis, “Worldwide trends in Honor Killings,” The Middle East Quarterly. Spring 2010 Volume 17, pp. 3-11

  • Ann-Weiner
    Souad

    A Survivor of Honor Killing

    Souad-Suanda, (her true identity must remain hidden), was 17 years old in 1974 when she looked over the terrace of her home in the West Bank and first saw the young man she fell in love with. Over time they arranged clandestine meetings and he promised to ask for her hand in marriage once her older sister was married. The relationship continued until a terrified Souad discovered that she was pregnant. Fearing reprisal from her family, she tried to miscarry the baby and when that failed she attempted, unsuccessfully, to run away.

    Having brought shame upon their family and in keeping with the principles of their community, her father arranged for a male cousin to kill Souad in order to save their honor. Honor killings are acts of vengeance committed by male family members against women who are believed to have brought dishonor to their family.1 Such killings happen in all geographical regions and are highest in the Muslim world. They are not connected to religious beliefs but rather to “patriarchal and traditional world views, emphasis placed on female virtue and a more general belief that violence against others is morally justified.” 2

    Honor-based violence such as murder and attempted murder are acts of torture since death rarely occurs quickly. They include acid burnings, beheadings, stoning, and immolation. Although Souad’s cousin poured gasoline over her head and set her on fire, Souad lived and was treated for horrific burns on her head and neck and arms and chest. While in a coma and bent into a mummy-like ball she gave birth to her son.

    A humanitarian organization eventually transported Souad to Geneva to help her recover from her pain and suffering and build a new life. Her autobiography Burned Alive: A Victim of the Law of Men is one of the few accounts by survivors of honor killings because so few victims live to tell their stories.

    Although Souad lives thousands of kilometers away from her country of origin, she dares not reveal her true identity or her whereabouts in fear that her family would find her and attempt to have her killed a second time.
    1. http://goldenageofgaia.com/building-nova-earth-toward-a-world-that-works-for-everyone/ending-gender-persecution/honor-killings-must-stop/
    2. Chesler, Phyllis, “Worldwide trends in Honor Killings,” The Middle East Quarterly. Spring 2010 Volume 17, pp. 3-11